Civil War Battles in Georgia

There were many battles in the state of Georgia during the Civil War.

Most of the battles were fought near Atlanta and in the Northwestern part of the state.

The battle of Chickamauga was fought in Georgia in 1863 resulting in a Confederate victory.

However the most famous event that took place in Georgia was Union general William T. Sherman’s march to the sea in late 1864.

Sherman is also famous for the capturing and burning of Atlanta in 1864 which began his march to the sea.

During Sherman’s march to the sea the Union forces destroyed everything of value that they found.

This included ripping up railroad tracks, stealing food and burning anything that the Confederates could use against them.

The southerners tried to stop the march but were unable to do so.

The march finally ended when the Union army arrived in Savannah Georgia.

Below are all Civil War battles in Georgia.

They are in the order in which they occurred during the Civil War.

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Civil War Battles in Georgia


Fort Pulaski

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Chatham County

Campaign: Operations against Fort Pulaski (1862)

Date(s): April 10-11, 1862

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. David Hunter and Capt. Quincy A. Gillmore [US]; Col. Charles H. Olmstead [CS]

Forces Engaged: The Port Royal Expeditionary Force’s Fort Pulaski investment troops [US]; Fort Pulaski Garrison [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 365 total (US 1; CS 364)

Description: Fort Pulaski, built by the U.S. Army before the war, is located near the mouth of the Savannah River, blocking upriver access to Savannah. Fortifications such as Pulaski, called third system forts, were considered invincible, but the new technology of rifled artillery changed that. On February 19, 1862, Brig. Gen. Thomas W. Sherman ordered Captain Quincy A. Gillmore, an engineer officer, to take charge of the investment force and begin the bombardment and capture of the fort. Gillmore emplaced artillery on the mainland southeast of the fort and began the bombardment on April 10 after Colonel Charles H. Olmstead refused to surrender the fort. Within hours, Gillmor’s rifled artillery had breached the southeast scarp of the fort, and he continued to exploit it. Some of his shells began to damage the traverse shielding the magazine in the northwest bastion. Realizing that if the magazine exploded the fort would be seriously damaged and the garrison would suffer severe casualties, Olmstead surrendered after 2:00 pm on April 11.

Result(s): Union victory


Fort McAllister I

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Bryan County

Campaign: Naval Attacks on Fort McAllister (1863)

Date(s): March 3, 1863

Principal Commanders: Capt. P. Drayton, U.S.N. [US]; Capt. George A. Anderson [CS]

Forces Engaged: Union Navy Flotilla [US]; Fort McAllister Garrison [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: Rear Adm. Samuel F. Du Pont [US] ordered three ironclads, Patapsco, Passaic, and Nahant, to test their guns and mechanical appliances and practice artillery firing by attacking Fort McAllister, then a small three-gun earthwork battery. On March 3, 1863, the three ironclads conducted an eight-hour bombardment. The bombardment did not destroy the battery but did some damage, while the three ironclads received some scratches and dents. The tests were helpful for knowledge and experience gained, but the fort did not fall, showing that the ironclads firepower could not destroy an earthen fort.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Davis Cross Roads

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: Dug Gap

Location: Dade County and Walker County

Campaign: Chickamauga Campaign (1863)

Date(s): September 10-11, 1863

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. James Negley [US]; Maj. Gen. Thomas C. Hindman and Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge [CS]

Forces Engaged: Two divisions [US]; unknown [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: After the Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed his offensive, aiming to force the Rebels out of Chattanooga. The three corps comprising Rosecrans’s army split and set out for Chattanooga by separate routes. Hearing of the Union advance, Braxton Bragg concentrated troops around Chattanooga. While Col. John T. Wilder’s artillery fired on Chattanooga, Rosecrans attempted to take advantage of Bragg’s situation and ordered other troops into Georgia. They raced forward, seized the important gaps, and moved out into McLemore’s Cove. Negley’s XIV Army Corps division, supported by Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird’s division, was moving across the mouth of the cove on the Dug Gap road when Negley learned that Rebels were concentrating around Dug Gap. Moving through determined resistance, he closed on the gap, withdrawing to Davis Cross Roads in the evening of September 10 to await the supporting division. Bragg had ordered General Hindman with his division to assault Negley at Davis Cross Roads in the flank, while Maj. Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne’s division forced its way through Dug Gap to strike Negley in front. Hindman was to receive reinforcements for this movement, but most of them did not arrive. The Rebel officers, therefore, met and decided that they could not attack in their present condition. The next morning, however, fresh troops did arrive, and the Rebels began to move on the Union line. The supporting Union division had, by now, joined Negley, and, hearing of a Confederate attack, the Union forces determined that a strategic withdrawal to Stevens Gap was in order. Negley first moved his division to the ridge east of West Chickamauga Creek where it established a defensive line. The other division then moved through them to Stevens Gap and established a defensive line there. Both divisions awaited the rest of Maj. Gen. George Thomas’s corps. All of this was accomplished under constant pursuit and fire from the Confederates.

Result(s): Union strategic victory


Chickamauga

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Catoosa County and Walker County

Campaign: Chickamauga Campaign (1863)

Date(s): September 18-20, 1863

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans and Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas [US]; Gen. Braxton Bragg and Lt. Gen. James Longstreet [CS]

Forces Engaged: The Army of the Cumberland [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 34,624 total (US 16,170; CS 18,454)

Description: After the Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed his offensive, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga. The three army corps comprising Rosecrans’s army split and set out for Chattanooga by separate routes. In early September, Rosecrans consolidated his forces scattered in Tennessee and Georgia and forced Bragg’s army out of Chattanooga, heading south. The Union troops followed it and brushed with it at Davis Cross Roads. Bragg was determined to reoccupy Chattanooga and decided to meet a part of Rosecrans’s army, defeat them, and then move back into the city. On the 17th he headed north, intending to meet and beat the XXI Army Corps. As Bragg marched north on the 18th, his cavalry and infantry fought with Union cavalry and mounted infantry which were armed with Spencer repeating rifles. Fighting began in earnest on the morning of the 19th, and Bragg’s men hammered but did not break the Union line. The next day, Bragg continued his assault on the Union line on the left, and in late morning, Rosecrans was informed that he had a gap in his line. In moving units to shore up the supposed gap, Rosencrans created one, and James Longstreet’s men promptly exploited it, driving one-third of the Union army, including Rosecrans himself, from the field. George H. Thomas took over command and began consolidating forces on Horseshoe Ridge and Snodgrass Hill. Although the Rebels launched determined assaults on these forces, they held until after dark. Thomas then led these men from the field leaving it to the Confederates. The Union retired to Chattanooga while the Rebels occupied the surrounding heights.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Ringgold Gap

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Catoosa County

Campaign: Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign (1863)

Date(s): November 27, 1863

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker [US]; Maj. Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne [CS]

Forces Engaged: Three divisions [US]; one division [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 912 total (US 432; CS 480)

Description: Following the Union victory at Missionary Ridge and the Rebel retreat, Yankee troops set out in pursuit. Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne’s command fell back to Ringgold Gap where the Western & Atlantic Railroad passed through Taylor’s Ridge. Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Hooker sent his force forward to seize the ridge, which it failed to do after five hours of heavy fighting.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Dalton I

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Whitfield County

Campaign: Demonstration on Dalton (1864)

Date(s): February 22-27, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Army of the Cumberland [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: From Vicksburg, Mississippi, Sherman launched a campaign to take the important railroad center at Meridian and, if the situation was favorable, to push on to Selma and threaten Mobile, in order to prevent the shipment of Confederate men and supplies. To counter the threat, Confederate President Jefferson Davis ordered troops into the area. While these operations unfolded, Thomas determined to probe Gen. Johnston’s army in the hope that Johnston’s loss of two divisions, sent to reinforce Lt. Gen. Leonidas Polk as he withdrew from Meridian to Demopolis, Alabama, would make him vulnerable. Skirmishing and intense fighting occurred throughout the demonstration. At Crow Valley on the 25th, Union troops almost turned the Rebel right flank, but ultimately it held. On the 27th, Thomas’s army withdrew, realizing that Johnston was ready and able to counter any assault.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Rocky Face Ridge

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: Combats at Buzzard Roost, Mill Creek, Dug Gap

Location: Whitfield County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): May 7-13, 1864

Principal Commanders:Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: Gen. Joseph E. Johnston had entrenched his army on the long, high mountain of Rocky Face Ridge and eastward across Crow Valley. As Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman approached, he decided to demonstrate against the position with two columns while he sent a third one through Snake Creek Gap, to the right, to hit the Western & Atlantic Railroad at Resaca. The two columns engaged the enemy at Buzzard Roost (Mill Creek Gap) and at Dug Gap. In the meantime, the third column, under Maj. Gen. James Birdseye McPherson, passed through Snake Creek Gap and on the 9th advanced to the outskirts of Resaca where it found Confederates entrenched. Fearing defeat, McPherson pulled his column back to Snake Creek Gap. On the 10th, Sherman decided to take most of his men and join McPherson to take Resaca. The next morning, Sherman’s army withdrew from in front of Rocky Face Ridge. Discovering Sherman’s movement, Johnston retired south towards Resaca on the 12th.

Result(s): Union victory (Union casualties were high, but they did force the Confederates off Rocky Face Ridge.)


Resaca

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Gordon County and Whitfield County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): May 13-15, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 5,547 total (US 2,747; CS 2,800)

Description: Gen. Joseph E. Johnston had withdrawn from Rocky Face Ridge to the hills around Resaca. On the 13th, the Union troops tested the Rebel lines to pinpoint their whereabouts. The next day full scale fighting occurred, and the Union troops were generally repulsed except on the Rebel right flank where Sherman did not fully exploit his advantage. On the 15th, the battle continued with no advantage to either side until Sherman sent a force across the Oostanula River, at Lay’s Ferry, towards Johnston’s railroad supply line. Unable to halt this Union movement, Johnston was forced to retire.

Result(s): Inconclusive


Adairsville

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Bartow County and Gordon County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): May 17, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Total unknown (US 200; CS unknown)

Description: Following the Battle of Resaca, May 13-15, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s army retreated southward while Sherman pursued. Failing to find a good defensive position south of Calhoun, Johnston continued to Adairsville while the Rebel cavalry fought a skillful rearguard action. On the 17th, skirmish fire continued throughout the day and into the early evening. Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard’s IV Corps ran into entrenched infantry of Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee’s corps, while advancing, about two miles north of Adairsville. The 44th Illinois and 24th Wisconsin (under the command of Maj. Arthur MacArthur, father of Douglas) attacked Cheatham’s Division at Robert Saxon (the Octagon House) and incurred heavy losses. Three Union divisions prepared for battle, but Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas halted them due to the approach of darkness. Sherman then concentrated his men in the Adairsville area to attack Johnston the next day. Johnston had originally expected to find a valley at Adairsville of suitable width to deploy his men and anchor his line with the flanks on hills. The valley, however, was too wide, so Johnston disengaged and withdrew.

Result(s): Confederate delaying action (Allowed Johnston to bait a trap at Cassville.)


New Hope Church

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Paulding County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): May 25-26, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman and Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Total unknown (US 1,600; CS unknown)

Description: After Johnston retreated to Allatoona Pass on May 19-20, Sherman decided that he would most likely pay dearly for attacking Johnston there, so he determined to move around Johnston’s left flank and steal a march toward Dallas. Johnston anticipated Sherman’s move and met the Union forces at New Hope Church. Sherman mistakenly surmised that Johnston had a token force and ordered Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker’s corps to attack. This corps was severely mauled. On the 26th, both sides en-trenched, and skirmishing continued throughout the day. Actions the next day in this area are discussed under Pickett’s Mills.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Dallas

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: New Hope Church, Pumpkinvine Creek

Location: Paulding County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): May 26-June 1, 1864 (May 28, 1864)

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 5,400 total (US 2,400; CS 3,000)

Description: Johnston’s army fell back from the vicinity of Cassville-Kinston, first to Allatoona Pass and then to the Dallas area and entrenched. Sherman’s army tested the Rebel line while entrenching themselves. The Battle of Dallas occurred on May 28 when Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee’s corps probed the Union defensive line, held by Maj. Gen. John A. Logan’s Army of the Tennessee corps, to exploit any weakness or possible withdrawal. Fighting ensued at two different points, but the Rebels were repulsed, suffering high casualties. Sherman continued looking for a way around Johnston’s line, and, on June 1, his cavalry occupied Allatoona Pass, which had a railroad and would allow his men and supplies to reach him by train. Sherman abandoned his lines at Dallas on June 5 and moved toward the railhead at Allatoona Pass forcing Johnston to follow soon afterwards.

Result(s): Union victory


Pickett’s Mill

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: New Hope, New Hope Church

Location: Paulding County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): May 27, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Oliver Otis Howard [US]; Maj. Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne [CS]

Forces Engaged: IV Corps [US]; Cleburne’s Division and Brig. Gen. John H. Kelly’s Brigade [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 2,100 total (US 1,600; CS 500)

Description: After the Union defeat at New Hope Church, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman ordered Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard to attack Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s seemingly exposed right flank. The Confederates were ready for the attack, which did not unfold as planned because supporting troops never appeared. The Rebels repulsed the attack causing high casualties.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Marietta [Operations]

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: Marietta Operations

Battles Associated with the Operations: Brushy Mountain, Gilgal Church, Lost Mountain, Mcaffee’s Cross Road, Mud Creek, Neal Dow Station, Noonday Creek, Pine Hill, Pine Mountain, Rottenwood Creek, Ruff’s Mill

Location: Cobb County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): June 9-July 3, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: During the Atlanta Campaign, Sherman maneuvered Johnston’s Confederate army out of several successive defensive positions in Cobb County. This strategy spared the Union army from making costly frontal attacks on the well-situated Confederates.

Sherman first found Johnston’s army entrenched in the Marietta area on June 9. The Confederate’s had established defensive lines along Brushy, Pine, and Lost Mountains. Sherman extended his forces beyond the Confederate lines, causing a partial Rebel withdrawal to another line of positions. After further pressure and skirmishing from Union forces, Johnston withdrew to an arc-shaped position centered on Kennesaw Mountain on June 18 and 19. Sherman made some unsuccessful attacks on this position but eventually extended the line on his right and forced Johnston to withdrawal from the Marietta area on July 2-3.

Result(s): Union victory


Kolb’s Farm

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Cobb County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): June 22, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield and Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker [US]; Lt. Gen. John B. Hood [CS]

Forces Engaged: Two corps [US]; Hood s Corps [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 1,350 total (US 350; CS 1,000)

Description: On the night of June 18-19, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, fearing envelopment, moved his army to a new, previously selected position astride Kennesaw Mountain, an entrenched arc-shaped line to the west of Marietta, to protect his supply line, the Western & Atlantic Railroad. Having encountered entrenched Rebels astride Kennesaw Mountain stretching southward, Sherman fixed them in front and extended his right wing to envelop their flank and menace the railroad. Joe Johnston countered by moving John B. Hood’s corps from the left flank to the right on June 22. Arriving in his new position at Mt. Zion Church, Hood decided, on his own, to attack. Warned of Hood’s intentions, Union generals John Schofield and Joseph Hooker entrenched. Union artillery and swampy terrain thwarted Hood’s attack and forced him to withdraw with costly casualties. Although the victor, Sherman’s attempts at envelopment had momentarily failed.

Result(s): Union victory


Kennesaw Mountain

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Cobb County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): June 27, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 4,000 total (US 3,000; CS 1,000)

Description: On the night of June 18-19, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, fearing envelopment, withdrew his army to a new, previously selected position astride Kennesaw Mountain. This entrenched arc-shaped line, to the north and west of Marietta, protected the Western & Atlantic Railroad, the supply link to Atlanta. Having defeated General John B. Hood troops at Kolb’s Farm on the 22nd, Sherman was sure that Johnston had stretched his line too thin and, therefore, decided on a frontal attack with some diversions on the flanks. On the morning of June 27, Sherman sent his troops forward after an artillery bombardment. At first, they made some headway overrunning Confederate pickets south of the Burnt Hickory Road, but attacking an enemy that was dug in was futile. The fighting ended by noon, and Sherman suffered high casualties.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Peachtree Creek

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Fulton County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): July 20, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas [US]; Gen. John B. Hood [CS]

Forces Engaged: Army of the Cumberland [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 6,506 total (US 1,710; CS 4,796)

Description: Under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, the Army of Tennessee had retired south of Peachtree Creek, an east to west flowing stream, about three miles north of Atlanta. Sherman split his army into three columns for the assault on Atlanta with George H. Thomas’s Army of the Cumberland moving from the north. Johnston had decided to attack Thomas, but Confederate President Jefferson Davis relieved him of command and appointed John B. Hood to take his place. Hood attacked Thomas after his army crossed Peachtree Creek. The determined assault threatened to overrun the Union troops at various locations. Ultimately, though, the Yankees held, and the Rebels fell back.

Result(s): Union victory


Atlanta

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Fulton County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): July 22, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Gen. John Bell Hood [CS]

Forces Engaged: Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 12,140 total (US 3,641; CS 8,499)

Description: Following the Battle of Peachtree Creek, Hood determined to attack Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson’s Army of the Tennessee. He withdrew his main army at night from Atlanta’s outer line to the inner line, enticing Sherman to follow. In the meantime, he sent William J. Hardee with his corps on a fifteen-mile march to hit the unprotected Union left and rear, east of the city. Wheeler’s cavalry was to operate farther out on Sherman’s supply line, and Gen. Frank Cheatham’s corps were to attack the Union front. Hood, however, miscalculated the time necessary to make the march, and Hardee was unable to attack until afternoon. Although Hood had outmaneuvered Sherman for the time being, McPherson was concerned about his left flank and sent his reserves Grenville Dodge’s XVI Army Corps to that location. Two of Hood’s divisions ran into this reserve force and were repulsed. The Rebel attack stalled on the Union rear but began to roll up the left flank. Around the same time, a Confederate soldier shot and killed McPherson when he rode out to observe the fighting. Determined attacks continued, but the Union forces held. About 4:00 pm, Cheatham’s corps broke through the Union front at the Hurt House, but Sherman massed twenty artillery pieces on a knoll near his headquarters to shell these Confederates and halt their drive. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan’s XV Army Corps then led a counterattack that restored the Union line. The Union troops held, and Hood suffered high casualties.

Result(s): Union victory


Ezra Church

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: Battle of the Poor House

Location: Fulton County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): July 28, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard [US]; Gen. John B. Hood [CS]

Forces Engaged: Army of the Tennessee [US]; two corps of Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 3,562 total (US 562; CS 3,000)

Description: Earlier, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman’s forces had approached Atlanta from the east and north. Hood had not defeated them, but he had kept them away from the city. Sherman now decided to attack from the west. He ordered the Army of the Tennessee, commanded by Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard, to move from the left wing to the right and cut Hood’s last railroad supply line between East Point and Atlanta. Hood foresaw such a maneuver and determined to send the two corps of Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee and Lt. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart to intercept and destroy the Union force. Thus, on the afternoon of July 28, the Rebels assaulted Howard at Ezra Church. Howard had anticipated such a thrust, entrenched one of his corps in the Confederates path, and repulsed the determined attack, inflicting numerous casualties. Howard, however, failed to cut the railroad.

Result(s): Union victory


Utoy Creek

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Fulton County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): August 5-7, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield [US]; Gen. John B. Hood [CS]

Forces Engaged: Army of the Ohio [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: After failing to envelop Hood’s left flank at Ezra Church, Sherman still wanted to extend his right flank to hit the railroad between East Point and Atlanta. He transferred John M. Schofield’s Army of the Ohio from his left to his right flank and sent him to the north bank of Utoy Creek. Although Schofield’s troops were at Utoy Creek on August 2, they, along with the XIV Corps, Army of the Cumberland, did not cross until the 4th. Schofield’s force began its movement to exploit this situation on the morning of the 5th, which was initially successful. Schofield then had to regroup his forces, which took the rest of the day. The delay allowed the Rebels to strengthen their defenses with abatis, which slowed the Union attack when it restarted on the morning of the 6th. The Federals were repulsed with heavy losses by Bate’s Division and failed in an attempt to break the railroad. On the 7th, the Union troops moved toward the Confederate main line and entrenched. Here they remained until late August.

Result(s): Inconclusive


Dalton II

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Whitfield County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): August 14-15, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. James B. Steedman [US]; Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler [CS]

Forces Engaged: District of Etowah [US]; Wheeler’s cavalry force [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler and his cavalry raided into North Georgia to destroy railroad tracks and supplies. They approached Dalton in the late afternoon of August 14 and demanded the surrender of the garrison. The Union commander, Col. Bernard Laibolt, refused to surrender and fighting ensued. Greatly outnumbered, the Union garrison retired to fortifications on a hill outside the town where they successfully held out, although the attack continued until after midnight. Skirmishing continued throughout the night. Around 5:00 am, on the 15th, Wheeler retired and became engaged with relieving infantry and cavalry under Maj. Gen. James B. Steedman’s command. Eventually, Wheeler withdrew. The contending forces reports vary greatly in describing the fighting, the casualties, and the amount of track and supplies captured and destroyed. This engagement was inconclusive, but since the Confederates withdrew, it may be termed a Union victory.

Result(s): Union victory (The Confederates withdrew.)


Lovejoy’s Station

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Clayton County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): August 20, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick [US]; Brig. Gen. William H. Jackson [CS]

Forces Engaged: Kilpatrick’s Cavalry Division [US]; Jackson’s Cavalry Division [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Description: While Confederate Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler was absent raiding Union supply lines from North Georgia to East Tennessee, Maj. Gen. William Sherman, unconcerned, sent Judson Kilpatrick to raid Rebel supply lines. Leaving on August 18, Kilpatrick hit the Atlanta & West Point Railroad that evening, tearing up a small area of tracks. Next, Kilpatrick headed for Lovejoy’s Station on the Macon & Western Railroad. In transit, on the 19th, Kilpatrick’s men hit the Jonesborough supply depot on the Macon & Western Railroad, burning great amounts of supplies. On the 20th, they reached Lovejoy’s Station and began their destruction. Rebel infantry (Cleburne’s Division) appeared and the raiders were forced to fight into the night, finally fleeing to prevent encirclement. Although Kilpatrick had destroyed supplies and track at Lovejoy’s Station, the railroad line was back in operation in two days.

Result(s): Confederate victory


Jonesborough

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Clayton County

Campaign: Atlanta Campaign (1864)

Date(s): August 31 September 1, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman [US]; Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee [CS]

Forces Engaged: Six corps [US]; two corps [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 3,149 total (US 1,149; CS 2,000)

Description: Sherman had successfully cut Hood’s supply lines in the past by sending out detachments, but the Confederates quickly repaired the damage. In late August, Sherman determined that if he could cut Hood’s supply lines the Macon & Western and the Atlanta & West Point Railroads the Rebels would have to evacuate Atlanta. Sherman, therefore, decided to move six of his seven infantry corps against the supply lines. The army began pulling out of its positions on August 25 to hit the Macon & Western Railroad between Rough and Ready and Jonesborough. To counter the move, Hood sent Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee with two corps to halt and possibly rout the Union troops, not realizing Sherman’s army was there in force. On August 31, Hardee attacked two Union corps west of Jonesborough but was easily repulsed. Fearing an attack on Atlanta, Hood withdrew one corps from Hardee’s force that night. The next day, a Union corps broke through Hardee’s troops which retreated to Lovejoy’s Station, and on the night of September 1, Hood evacuated Atlanta. Sherman did cut Hood’s supply line but failed to destroy Hardee’s command.

Result(s): Union victory


Allatoona

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Bartow County

Campaign: Franklin-Nashville Campaign (1864)

Date(s): October 5, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. Gen. John M. Corse [US]; Maj. Gen. Samuel G. French [CS]

Forces Engaged: One brigade (1,944 men) [US]; one division (approx. 2,000 men) [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 1,505 total (US 706; CS 799)

Description: After the fall of Atlanta, Hood moved northward to threaten the Western & Atlantic Railroad, Sherman’s supply line. He attacked a number of minor garrisons and damaged track during October 2-4. Sherman sent reinforcements John M. Corse’s brigade to Allatoona just before the Rebels attacked there. Maj. Gen. Samuel G. French’s Confederate division arrived near Allatoona at sunrise on the 5th. After demanding a surrender and receiving a negative reply, French attacked. The Union outer line survived a sustained two and a half hour attack, but then fell back and regrouped in an earthen Star fort of Allatoona Pass. French repeatedly attacked, but the fort held. The Rebels began to run out of ammunition, and reports of arriving Union reinforcements influenced them to move off and rejoin Hood’s force.

Result(s): Union victory


Griswoldville

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Jones County and Twiggs County

Campaign: Savannah Campaign (1864)

Date(s): November 22, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. Gen. Charles C. Walcutt [US]; Brig. Gen. Pleasant J. Philips and Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler [CS]

Forces Engaged: 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, XV Corps, Army of the Tennessee and two regiments of cavalry [US]; 1st Division Georgia Militia and Cavalry Corps, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 712 total (US 62; CS 650)

Description: Brig. Gen. Charles Walcutt was ordered to make a demonstration, with the six infantry regiments and one battery that comprised his brigade, toward Macon to ascertain the disposition of enemy troops in that direction. He set out on the morning of November 22, and after a short march he ran into some of Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler’s cavalry and drove them beyond Griswoldville. Having accomplished his mission, Walcutt retired to a position at Duncan’s Farm and fortified it with logs and rails to meet an expected Rebel attack force composed of three brigades of Georgia State Militia. The Georgia Militia had been ordered from Macon to Augusta, thinking the latter was Sherman’s next objective, and accidentally collided with Walcutt’s force. The Union force withstood three determined charges before receiving reinforcements of one regiment of infantry and two regiments of cavalry. The Rebels did not attack again and soon retired.

Result(s): Union victory


Buck Head Creek

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Jenkins County

Campaign: Savannah Campaign (1864)

Date(s): November 28, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick [US]; Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler [CS]

Forces Engaged: 3rd Cavalry Division, Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; cavalry corps, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 646 total (US 46; CS 600)

Description: As Sherman’s infantry marched southeast through Georgia, his cavalry, under Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick moved northeastward, on November 24, 1864, to destroy the railroad midway between Augusta and Millen, burn the trestle near Briar Creek and, if possible, release Union prisoners confined at Camp Lawton, near Millen, while feigning a drive towards Augusta. Confederate Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler was fooled and concentrated his cavalry forces around Augusta. When Kilpatrick did not show, Wheeler realized his mistake and rode off in an attempt to catch his Union counterpart. On the 26th, Wheeler caught up with two lagging Union regiments, attacked their camp, chased them to the larger force and prevented Kilpatrick from destroying the Briar Creek trestle. Kilpatrick instead destroyed a mile of track in the area and moved southwest to join up with Sherman. Kilpatrick also discovered that the Union prisoners at Camp Lawton had been taken to other unknown sites. He encamped near Buck Head Creek on the night of the 27th. Wheeler came along the next morning, almost captured Kilpatrick, and pursued him and his men to Buck Head Creek. As Kilpatrick’s main force crossed the creek, one regiment, supported by artillery, fought a rearguard action severely punishing Wheeler and then burned the bridge behind them. Wheeler soon crossed and followed, but a Union brigade behind barricades at Reynolds’s Plantation halted the Rebels drive, eventually forcing them to retire.

Result(s): Union victory


Waynesborough

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Burke County

Campaign: Savannah Campaign (1864)

Date(s): December 4, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick [US]; Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler [CS]

Forces Engaged: 3rd Cavalry Division, Military Division of the Mississippi [US]; Cavalry Command, Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 440 total (US 190; CS 250)

Description: As Sherman’s infantry marched southeast through Georgia, his cavalry under Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick rode northeastward. He set out on the morning of December 4 to attack Waynesborough and destroy Joseph Wheeler’s cavalry command. That morning Kilpatrick’s men advanced, driving the Rebel skirmishers in front of them. The Union force then came up against a defensive line of barricades which they eventually overran. As the Union advance continued, they met more barricades which required time to overcome. Finally, the Confederates fell back to a final line of barricades within the town. After furious fighting, the Union troops broke through and Wheeler’s force ran.

Result(s): Union victory


Fort McAllister II

Civil War Battles in Georgia

Other Names: None

Location: Bryan County

Campaign: Savannah Campaign (1864)

Date(s): December 13, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. Gen. William B. Hazen [US]; Maj. George A. Anderson [CS]

Forces Engaged: 2nd Division, XV Corps, Army of the Tennessee [US]; Fort McAllister Garrison (120 men) [CS]

Estimated Casualties: 205 total (US 134; CS 71)

Description: As Sherman’s troops approached Savannah they sorely required supplies. Sherman determined that if he could take Fort McAllister, supply ships could reach him. Thus, he ordered Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard, commander of his right wing, to take the fort. Howard chose Brig. Gen. William B. Hazen to accomplish the task. Hazen, in the afternoon of December 13, had his men in line for the attack. Upon giving the order to attack, his men rushed forward through the various obstacles prepared for them, entered the fort, and captured it. With his supply line open, Sherman could now prepare for the siege and capture of Savannah.

Result(s): Union victory

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